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Dr. Alekseyev Receives NSF Career Award

Dr. Alekseyev has received the National Science Foundation's CAREER award. The Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program is NSF's most prestigious award in support of the early career-development activities of junior faculty.

The award supports his research on developing software and algorithms to aid in the reconstruction of ancestral genomes and the construction of an evolutionary history of genomes.

Hood and DeBruin win Magellan Scholarship

Garret DeBruinLogan HoodTwo of our undergraduate students received Magellan Scholar awards. Logan Hood received an award for his project on "Affordable Medical Ultrasound Training Simulator" and Garret DeBruin for his project titled "Classification and Detection of Proteotypic Peptides Through The Use of Hidden Markov Models and Neural Networks." Congratulations to both of them!

JJ Shepherd at TEDxColumbiaSC

Our very own JJ Shepherd will be giving a talk at TEDxColumbiaSC 2013, in January. The talk is titled "How video games should be taken seriously as a research field, a rehabilitation aid and an art form". In this USC News article JJ says:

I want to give this talk to spread the message that games are not just a ‘kid’s toy,’ but are a unique medium that combines art and science into one artifact. These artifacts can not only entertain, but also teach us, train us and evoke new ideas that no other medium has ever been able to do.

Wireless Snooping on Electric Meters

MIT's Technology Review covers Dr. Wenyuan Xu's research on snooping on electric meters in their article Another Reason for "Smart" Electric Meters.

Researchers from the University of South Carolina discovered that they could read meter signals at a 400-unit housing complex in such detail they could determine that 27 units were unoccupied. And because the meters send out data every 30 seconds, the researchers could infer some residents' daily habits by spotting sudden jumps in electricity usage. In their paper, the researchers wrote that in one unit in the complex, "the owners got up at 7 a.m., left for work at 9 a.m., and returned home around 6 p.m. on Friday."

NSF Funds Mobile Technology for Perioperative Services

Dr. Nathan Huynh and Dr. Jose M Vidal have received $600K from the National Science Foundation (NSF) for research on mobile technology for use in hospitals, as part of a $1.4M grant shared with colleagues from Clemson University. The goal of the research is to determine how mobile technology can best be used to improve coordination in a hospital's perioperative services. The researchers will develop and test a mobile app that will include speech recognition, natural language processing, and other artificial intelligence techniques in order to deliver the right information at the right time to hospital staff, and to recommend tasks that should be handled next.

Undergraduate Scholarship Winner

Mr. Andrey Gavel has been awarded a 2012 UPE Special Recognition Scholarship Award from Upsilon Pi Epsilon, the Computing Sciences Honor Society. This is a nice honor. It is a national competition held once a year and open to all Computer Science undergraduate and graduate majors. You can view the official list of winners for this year.

Gamecock Computing Symposium Award Winners

Our first Gamecock Computing Research Symposium was a major success. We had over 40 research posters. All who attended had very positive things to say about it and other departments are already thinking about copying us, if they can! If you do not already follow our Twitter feed (also posted on this page, right column) then you might have missed this photo album, taken by Prof. Nelakuditi or this one, by me.

Most importantly, we want to congratulate Mr. Jarrell Waggoner and Mr. Nicholas Stiffler for winning the poster awards! Both shown here receiving their awards from Dr. Huhns.

Genome3D: Exploring the Genome in a Computer

Prof. Jijun Tang and colleagues at MUSC have received a grant from the NSF for their collaborative research on "Developing a 3D Browser to Explore Genomes". This project builds upon the success of the Genome3D and leverages recent findings on complex spatial genomic models. Exploring genomes through 3D visualization will significantly advance genome research in integrating epigenomic data, studying long range inter- and intra-chromosome interaction, and analyzing structural features of genetic variations. Check it out on the video below.

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